The Peacock Throne

Why can’t the Bronx Zoo seem to keep it’s caged animals…well, in the cage? In the case of the latest fugitive, the zoo’s peacock, it’s quite clear this creature is just too fabulous to be limited to the confines of any walls, hence why she felt the need to escape. Check out that outfit she’s sporting! Obviously way too glamorous to be kept behind a fence for onlookers to gawk at.

Image via Color Addict

I must confess, I adore peacocks, and it’s not only because I’m Persian. If you don’t already know the significance of this creature to the Persian culture (as clearly everything in life can indirectly be tied back to Persian history), let me school you on why my peeps love Peacocks (Sweet Mother of Fendi! I sound like the dad from My Big Fat Greek Wedding)!

Now that that miniature digression is behind us, I will continue to educate you on why peacocks are important to my peeps, and what makes me love them so. The Peacock Throne, which in Persian translates to Takht -e- Tavus, was first introduced to Persians when Nader Shah Afshari brought back a throne resembling a peacock in its beauty and extravagance to Persia after his successful invasion of the Mughal Empire of India in 1739. Since then, the Peacock throne has been synonymous with glorious dynasties in Persia (though it has also been a source of backlash in criticizing monocracy) and peacocks remain a symbol of beauty and elegance for Iranians in Iran and among those in diaspora. That’s the long version. The short version is they are soooooo pretty!

One of the original Peacock Thrones of the Persian dynasties (Image via Mastoloni)

And now, for some fashion that at least slightly resembles peacocks…





I do believe that if peacocks wore shoes, they would prefer these Balenciaga architectural pumps!

Fashion images via STREETFSN

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This entry was posted in impeccableCULTURE, impeccableHUMOR, impeccableINSPIRATION, impeccableNEWS, impeccableSTYLE and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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